Ages 3 to 5

In this tab you can find activities, games, stories, and resources to engage your children according to different age levels. These resources can help your child get excited about reading and learning to read.

These activities are targeted for ages 3-5.


Promoting Literacy

with dinnertime storytelling, family conversation, and books about food. Regular family dinner may be a more powerful vocabulary-builder for young kids than reading.

Read the full article here.


Unite for Literacy

Unite for Literacy projects build home libraries and support families to develop a daily habit of reading, both of which are key factors in growing lifelong readers. Read together and listen to books of your choice in a variety of languages.

Start Reading Today!


How Parents Can Instill Reading

Boy and Girl reading book.

How Parents Can Instill Reading. Parents often ask how they can help their children learn to read; and it’s no wonder that they’re interested in this essential skill. Reading plays an important role in later school success.  Parents often ask how they can help their children learn to read; and it’s no wonder that they’re interested in this essential skill. Reading plays an important role in later school success. 

Reading full article here.


The Million Word Gap

The Million Word GapThat’s how many fewer words some children may hear by kindergarten. Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to.

Million Word Gap Article


Activities- Helping Your Child Become a Reader- Children Ages 3-6

As a parent, you can help your child want to learn in a way no one else can. That desire to learn is a key to your child’s later success. Enjoyment is important! So, if you and your child don’t enjoy one activity, move on to another. You can always return to any activity later on.

Helping Your Child Become a Reader
Some ideas you will find here.



Ohio’s BOLD Beginning!

Early literacy is what kids know about reading and writing before they can actually read or write. You are your child’s first teacher and preparing them to read can be easy and fun – whether you’re at home or on the go.

Five of the best ways to prepare your child to read are talking, singing, reading, writing and playing. It’s never too early or too late to get started!

Early Literacy


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Milestones

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye bye” are called developmental milestones. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, act, and move (crawling, walking, etc.)

CDC Developmental Milestones
Some ideas you will find here.


How to Grow a Reader

That magical breakthrough moment — when your child shows an interest in letters, and begins to make out words on a page or in the world itself — happens at different ages for different children, even within the same family. Most parents describe a long period in which a child can’t keep letters straight or identify words, then a quick burst of comprehension, followed by more regular, but still sudden leaps. It really can seem like magic — so don’t rush it.

How to Grow a Reader (This article is located after “How to Raise a Reader”)


A Child Becomes a Reader: Proven Ideas from Research for Parents Birth through Preschool

Mothers, fathers, grandparents, and caregivers, this booklet is for you. It gives ideas for playing, talking, and reading with your child that will help him* become a good reader and writer later in life.

A Child Becomes a Reader for Parents Birth through Preschool (Pages 11-16)


Talk, Read, and Sing Together Every Day!

A language rich environment is one in which children are surrounded by talking, singing, and reading and have many opportunities throughout their day, across all activities, to communicate with others and engage in back-and-forth conversations. A rich language environment is important to children’s early learning, and can have strong effects on early language, vocabulary, reading, and math skills, as well as on children’s social-emotional development.

Talk, Read, and Sing Together Every Day


ColorinColorado – Help Your Child Learn to Read

There are lots of ways that you can help your children learn to read!  From the time that they are babies to the time that they are in high school, there are many little steps you can take along the way — rhyming  and singing songs, reading out loud, sounding out letters, going to the library, and reading books together in your home language. 

Helping your children learn to read might also mean finding support if they are having difficulty, which can affect their future success. This site is filled with tips for what you can do at home, fun activities, suggestions for choosing books to share together, and ideas on how you can prepare your child for a lifetime and love of reading.

Help Your Child Learn to Read (includes resources in Spanish)
Some ideas you will find here.

Getting Ready to Read

Beginning Readers


Learning About Your Child’s Reading Development

Learning to read is difficult. While spoken language develops in most cases naturally, reading requires explicitsystematic instruction.

This page from The National Center on Improving Literacy, describes typical reading development from emergent through fluent reading. Sometimes we have concerns. This article offers a quick overview of the skills to look for and what to do if the child in your life seems to not be acquiring the skills.


Development of Phonological Skills

Basic listening skills and “word awareness” are critical precursors to phonological awareness. Learn the milestones for acquiring phonological skills. This page helps parents to understand the importance of developmental phonological skills through easy to understand definitions. There is also a table which notes the age where 80 to 90 percent of typical students have achieved each phonological skill.


Parent Guide to Helping Your Child Learn to Read for Preschool through Grade Three

Success in school starts with reading.  When children become good readers in the early grades, they are more likely to become better learners throughout their school years and beyond. Learning to read is hard work for children.

Put Reading First – Parent Guide


Defining Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a brain-based learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read. For individuals with dyslexia, specific portions of the brain typically associated with important reading processes may not function in the same ways that they do in individuals without dyslexia. Individuals with dyslexia often have difficulty with phonological processing, spelling, or rapid visual-verbal responding. Importantly, dyslexia is related to reading difficulties, not difficulties that arise from intellectual functioning.

  • Defining Dyslexia
    Dyslexia affects about one in every five individuals, making it the most commonly diagnosed learning disability. Dyslexia affects the brain areas associated with detection and processing of sounds and their corresponding letters. These letter-sound linkages are fundamental to reading. When these brain regions do not function efficiently to make these connections, reading development is affected.

Family and Community Toolbox

The purpose of the Family and Community Toolbox is to provide resources in order to build upon the natural learning opportunities that occur within a child’s daily routine in the home and community. The resources contained in this toolbox provide encouragement to families and caregivers in supporting the early language and literacy development of children in their care.

Family and Community Toolbox


Getting Involved with Your Child’s Learning

Family involvement strengthens student learning and improves academic achievement. Students with active family support have better attendance, pass more classes and earn more credits resulting in higher grade point averages and higher test scores.


Preparing For Kindergarten Success guide for Families. (Pages 2-7)


Talking is Teaching

These resources are for parents and caregivers—including book recommendations, posters, parent tip sheets, social media posts, and more—all designed to build children’s early brain and language development through talking, reading, and singing.

Talking is Teaching Content Bundles


Ohio’s Early Learning & Development Standards

The Standards support the development and well-being of young children to foster their learning. Because the infant/toddler years are marked by rapid developmental change, the Standards are divided into three meaningful transitional periods: Infants (birth to around 8 months), Young Toddlers (6 to around 18 months), and Older Toddlers (16 to around 36 months).

This Parent page has information you can use to help guide your child’s education. Active, involved parents are an essential resource for Ohio’s schools in making the most of every child’s educational experience, from pre-kindergarten all the way through high school.

Ohio’s Early Learning & Development Standards


Ohio Department of Education- Parents

Active, involved parents are an essential resource for Ohio’s schools in making the most of every child’s educational experience, from pre-kindergarten all the way through high school. This page has information you can use to help guide your child’s education.

My Child is in…Preschool, Kindergarten, Elementary School, etc.