Kindergarten and First Grade

In this tab you can find activities, games, stories, and resources to engage your children according to different age levels. These resources can help your child get excited about reading and learning to read.

These activities are targeted for ages Kindergarten and First Grade.


9 ways to build phonological awareness in pre-K and kindergarten

There are a few ways kids in pre-K and kindergarten can get ready to read. One way is by noticing and playing with the words, rhymes, and syllables they hear in everyday speech. This called  phonological awareness .

Kids also start to tune in to the individual sounds or phonemes in words. This is called phonemic awareness. The more you can build on these early “pre-reading” skills, the more prepared your child will be for the challenge of learning to read.

Read Full Article


Promoting Literacy

with dinnertime storytelling, family conversation, and books about food. Regular family dinner may be a more powerful vocabulary-builder for young kids than reading.

Read the full article here.


Unite for Literacy

Unite for Literacy projects build home libraries and support families to develop a daily habit of reading, both of which are key factors in growing lifelong readers. Read together and listen to books of your choice in a variety of languages.

Start Reading Today!


How Parents Can Instill Reading

Boy and Girl reading book.

How Parents Can Instill Reading. Parents often ask how they can help their children learn to read; and it’s no wonder that they’re interested in this essential skill. Reading plays an important role in later school success.  Parents often ask how they can help their children learn to read; and it’s no wonder that they’re interested in this essential skill. Reading plays an important role in later school success. 

Reading full article here.


Activities- Helping Your Child Become a Reader- Children Ages 3-5

As a parent, you can help your child want to learn in a way no one else can. That desire to learn is a key to your child’s later success. Enjoyment is important! So, if you and your child don’t enjoy one activity, move on to another. You can always return to any activity later on.

Helping Your Child Become a Reader
Some ideas you will find here.



A Child Becomes a Reader: Proven Ideas from Research for Parents Birth through Preschool

Mothers, fathers, grandparents, and caregivers, this booklet is for you. It gives ideas for playing, talking, and reading with your child that will help him* become a good reader and writer later in life.

Kindergarten (pages 9-18)
1st grade (pages 19-25)


Learning About Your Child’s Reading Development

Learning to read is difficult. While spoken language develops in most cases naturally, reading requires explicitsystematic instruction.

This page from The National Center on Improving Literacy, describes typical reading development from emergent through fluent reading. Sometimes we have concerns. This article offers a quick overview of the skills to look for and what to do if the child in your life seems to not be acquiring the skills.



Development of Phonological Skills

Basic listening skills and “word awareness” are critical precursors to phonological awareness. Learn the milestones for acquiring phonological skills. This page helps parents to understand the importance of developmental phonological skills through easy to understand definitions. There is also a table which notes the age where 80 to 90 percent of typical students have achieved each phonological skill.


Parent Guide to Helping Your Child Learn to Read for Preschool through Grade Three

Success in school starts with reading.  When children become good readers in the early grades, they are more likely to become better learners throughout their school years and beyond. Learning to read is hard work for children.

Put Reading First – Parent Guide


Defining Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a brain-based learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read. For individuals with dyslexia, specific portions of the brain typically associated with important reading processes may not function in the same ways that they do in individuals without dyslexia. Individuals with dyslexia often have difficulty with phonological processing, spelling, or rapid visual-verbal responding. Importantly, dyslexia is related to reading difficulties, not difficulties that arise from intellectual functioning.

  • Defining Dyslexia
    Dyslexia affects about one in every five individuals, making it the most commonly diagnosed learning disability. Dyslexia affects the brain areas associated with detection and processing of sounds and their corresponding letters. These letter-sound linkages are fundamental to reading. When these brain regions do not function efficiently to make these connections, reading development is affected.

Parents and Families- Explore by Topic-Dyslexia


Family and Community Toolbox

The purpose of the Family and Community Toolbox is to provide resources in order to build upon the natural learning opportunities that occur within a child’s daily routine in the home and community. The resources contained in this toolbox provide encouragement to families and caregivers in supporting the early language and literacy development of children in their care.

Family and Community Toolbox


Ohio’s Early Learning & Development Standards

The Standards support the development and well-being of young children to foster their learning. Because the infant/toddler years are marked by rapid developmental change, the Standards are divided into three meaningful transitional periods: Infants (birth to around 8 months), Young Toddlers (6 to around 18 months), and Older Toddlers (16 to around 36 months).

This Parent page has information you can use to help guide your child’s education. Active, involved parents are an essential resource for Ohio’s schools in making the most of every child’s educational experience, from pre-kindergarten all the way through high school.

Ohio’s Early Learning & Development Standards (Pages 15-34)


Ohio Department of Education- Parents

Active, involved parents are an essential resource for Ohio’s schools in making the most of every child’s educational experience, from pre-kindergarten all the way through high school. This page has information you can use to help guide your child’s education.

My Child is in…Preschool, Kindergarten, Elementary School, etc.