Tips if Your Child Needs Help
Image of Girl with Book on Face

In this tab you can find activities, games, stories, and resources to engage your children according to different age levels. These resources can help your child get excited about reading and learning to read.

These activities are targeted for children who may need additional help with reading.

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Ohio’s Dyslexia Guidebook

Ohio’s Dyslexia Guidebook is available now. As required by Ohio law, Ohio’s Dyslexia Guidebook contains best practices and methods for universal screening, intervention and remediation for children with dyslexia or children displaying dyslexic characteristics and tendencies. Districts and schools should use the guidebook to access critical information for successful implementation of Ohio’s dyslexia support laws.

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10 Tips to Introduce Reading to a Young Child Who Is Blind or Visually Impaired

One of the first and most important things to remember when introducing books and literacy experiences to a young child with a visual impairment is that the child is a child first.  While there are certain tips and techniques that will make reading more meaningful and pleasurable for children who are blind or visually impaired, many of the same principles apply to ALL children.  Sharing quiet time together with a family member, teacher or other special person enjoying stories that are funny or interesting is something that all of us love, regardless of our age or the amount of vision we have.  

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Empowering Parents

If you have a child who is a struggling reader, your family is not alone. Learning to read is a challenge for almost 40 percent of kids, and an even bigger challenge for their parents.

Empowering Parents, a PBS special hosted by Al Roker, visits schools in Huntingtown, Maryland, and Portland, Oregon, to see how families learn to identify early signs of reading problems and find ideas for getting their kids the help and support they need to succeed at reading.

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Ten Things to Help Your Struggling Reader

As a special education teacher who teaches struggling readers with different disabilities, I’m often crafting mental lists of things I wish parents knew about their dyslexic children. Most important, I am eager for the parents of my students to understand that their children can and will learn to read, but it will take time.

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Defining Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a brain-based learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read.

Defining Dyslexia
Dyslexia affects about one in every five individuals, making it the most commonly diagnosed learning disability. Dyslexia affects the brain areas associated with detection and processing of sounds and their corresponding letters. These letter-sound linkages are fundamental to reading. When these brain regions do not function efficiently to make these connections, reading development is affected.





Reading & Writing Difficulties

Learning to read and write can be very difficult. There are a wide variety of reasons why a child may be having a hard time. These articles provide tips on how to get support and advice if you think your child may need some extra help.

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Concerned About Your Child’s Development?

Talk to Your Child’s Doctor

As a parent, you know your child best. If your child is not meeting the milestones for his or her age, or if you think there could be a problem with the way your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves talk to your child’s doctor and share your concerns. Don’t wait. Acting early can make a real difference!

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Milestones

Skills such as taking a first step, smiling for the first time, and waving “bye bye” are called developmental milestones. Children reach milestones in how they play, learn, speak, act, and move (crawling, walking, etc.).

Click on the age of your child to see the milestones:

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Understanding why kids struggle with reading

The process of learning to read isn’t easy. When kids struggle with reading, it doesn’t mean they’re not smart. It also doesn’t mean they’re lazy. In fact, kids who have trouble reading are often trying as hard as they can. 

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